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Summer Running Guide

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SUMMER RUNNING

Running on sunrise seaside trail.

I love running, and I love summer, but running in the summer is something I kind of hate. As much as I love running by green flowering trees and sparkling waters, the heat and humidity usually get the better of me and send me running indoors for the treadmill or straight into a cold swimming pool. But, avoiding the outdoors is out of the question if you are serious about sticking to a running routine or training for a race.

If you struggle with running in the summer, you are not alone. EVERY runner has had their own battles with the summer heat, but this handy guide will give you all information you need to ward off most of summer running dangers as well as how to make the most out of your training program in the summer months.

3 REASONS WHY RUNNING IN THE HEAT IS HARD

#1. HIGHER BODY TEMPERATURE

#2. YOU SWEAT LESS EFFICIENTLY

#3. YOUR HEART MUST WORK DOUBLE-TIME

Now that I’ve likely scared you out of pursuing a summer running routine, let me assure you that running in the heat is safe and manageable with the right equipment and know-how. Keep reading for all the info you need to become a summer-running machine (you might even learn to love it).

Read the complete article at Train for a 5K.com

The 25 Golden Rules of Running

 

The 25 Golden Rules of Running

http://www.runnersworld.com/running-tips/the-25-golden-rules-of-running?cid=socMOT_20150705_48352656&adbid=10152893362571987&adbpl=fb&adbpr=98154869861. The Specificity Rule

The most effective training mimics the event for which you're training.

2. The 10-Percent Rule

Increase weekly training mileage by no more than 10 percent per week.

9. The Conversation Rule

You should be able to talk in complete sentences while running.

12. The Seven-Year Rule

Runners improve for about seven years.

Mike Tymn noticed this in the early 1980s and wrote about it in his National Masters News column. “My seven-year adaptation theory was based on the fact that so many runners I talked to ran their best times an average of seven years after they started,” he recalls.

15. The Sleep Rule

Sleep one extra minute per night for each mile per week that you train.

So if you run 30 miles a week, sleep an extra half hour each night. “Sleep deprivation has a negative impact on training,” says David Claman, M.D., director of the University of California-San Francisco Sleep Disorders Center. “The average person needs seven and a half to eight hours of sleep, so increase that amount when you're training.” The 25 Golden Rules of Running | Runner's World

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