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Fear – It’s all about what you do with it

FEARFear grips us all at one time or another. What you do with that fear is your choice and what matters.  Do you run and hide or face and conquer your fear? If you run and hide, where and how long do you hide? You can't hide forever. Whether you face the fear and do something about it or not there will be an end result. When we don't conquer our fears, they return to haunt us and usually when we least expect it or are prepared for it and usually at inopportune times.

Be prepared for when your fear strikes you again. Know what invokes your fear. Fear of failure, fear of success, fear of not doing what's right. Define it and own it. There's a possible challenge for you unless you've been analyzing the fear for a while. Exercise is a great way to help calm some fear so you can form a plan of attack to deal with it. Exercise releases endorphin's which are the body’s natural opiates. They trigger a positive feeling in the body and an energizing outlook on life especially if you find an activity you can really get into.  This can help you face some of your fears and maybe tackle them. So like the first meaning says, run! Just don't hide. Or you can choose another exercise like Yoga, Pilates, or cycling. Whichever you choose, relax and get those endorphin's flowing.

Enjoy the little things like a perfect run

The Perfect Run

 

The Perfect Run

http://www.irunfar.com/2014/03/the-perfect-run.htmlMarch 26, 2014 by Geoff Roes ·

www.irunfar.com
There are so many aspects which are a part of every run we go on that it seems almost impossible to expect to ever have what we might call a ‘perfect run.’ The weather could always be a little more pleasant, the scenery a little more breathtaking, and our bodies a little stronger (to name but a few reasons why a run could be made even better). In this sense it would be easy to subscribe to the belief that there is no such thing as the ‘perfect run.’ The reason I can’t subscribe to this belief though, is that I have had a handful of perfect runs.

By no means are these perfect runs an easy thing to come by. Ninety-nine percent (or more) of the runs I’ve been on could have been better if certain aspects of the run were better. Every now and then though, a run in its totality seems to trump all of these individual aspects. When this happens it doesn’t even really matter what the weather is like or how our bodies are feeling. We can get to this place more often when the weather is great or when our bodies feel really strong, but a perfect run is a run in which the weather, the scenery, your body, or any other external factors seem to cease to exist. It is a run when you get done and you don’t even know what the weather was like or you don’t care how your body felt. This isn’t to say that you are not noticing these things around you, but instead that you are so in tune with everything around you that you cease putting any quantifiable value on them. It is when the scenery becomes not something that you see with your eyes, but something that you see yourself as a part of. Read Original Article Here…

restore your running plan

Back on Track

 

Back on Track

http://www.runnersworld.com/running-tips/back-track-1?cid=socTP_20150728_49827936&adbid=10152937112146987&adbpl=fb&adbpr=9815486986Even the most devoted runners can get sidetracked from their routine by crazy deadlines, long-awaited vacations, or (worse) nagging injuries. But rather than fret over how long it's going to take you to return to speed, it's important to keep such detours in perspective. “You shouldn't feel guilty about taking a break from running,” says Marissa Tiamfook, a running coach based in Los Angeles. “Focus on the fact that you want to get back out there.” If for whatever reason your running shoes have gathered dust, here's how to get back on track.

SIDETRACKED BY: A jammed scheduleYou've ditched your workouts to make time for longer hours at the office or to plan a big event. The time away from exercising has left you tired and grumpy. “Science has proven that running is a potent stress-buster,” says Tiamfook. “But once momentum has stopped, it's hard to crank it up again.”

SIDETRACKED BY: A jammed schedule
COMEBACK PLAN: Sign up for a 5-K
SIDETRACKED BY: Postrace slump
COMEBACK PLAN: Set a new goal
SIDETRACKED BY: Vacation
COMEBACK PLAN: Dress the part
SIDETRACKED BY: A budding relationship
COMEBACK PLAN: Exercise together
SIDETRACKED BY: An injury
COMEBACK PLAN: Start slow
FEEL BETTER:
Force of Habit
1 Set a Cue
2 Reward Yourself
3 Repeat Read Original Article Here…

5 Truths about Running and Caffeine

 

http://www.runnersworld.com/fuel-school/5-truths-about-running-and-caffeine?cid=socNut_20150701_48455506&adbid=10152884781856987&adbpl=fb&adbpr=9815486986How does caffeine affect exercise?It can be more than just a morning pick-me-up. Caffeine has a number of physiologic effects that can help improve athletic performance. It is rapidly absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and is a mild stimulant that affects multiple organ systems.

Can you get too much of a good thing?While there is no consistent evidence for adverse effects on a healthy cardiovascular system, some athletes—like those with preexisting heart conditions, pregnant women, or those on certain medications—should limit their intake. And just like you discovered in college while pulling an all-nighter, if you consume too much caffeine, sleeplessness and jitters are likely to occur (especially in people not used to caffeine). As for leaching the calcium out of your bones? No convincing research links caffeine to osteoporosis. Read Original Article Here…

4 Signs You Should Retire Your Running Shoes

 

4 Signs You Should Retire Your Running Shoes

http://running.competitor.com/2015/06/shoes-and-gear/4-signs-you-should-retire-your-running-shoes_131065Running shoes don’t last forever, but you can’t necessarily follow the old adage that each pair will last 400 miles either. Running in old shoes can result in a variety of ailments as the shoe’s cushioning and structure breaks down, or trauma-related injuries (such as a bone bruise under the metatarsal heads) as the outsole wears thin.

Once you’ve burned through the outer layer of rubber to the point there is no tread or where you can see the next layer of material, it’s time to get new shoes. (The wear-pattern is also an indication of your gait pattern, so if there is considerable wear on one side and little sign of wear on another, it could indicate that you’re imbalanced.) Via running.competitor.com

Tips for Running in Humidity

 

Tips for Running in Humidity

http://www.runnersworld.com/hot-weather-running/tips-for-running-in-humidity?cid=socTP_20150620_47829936&adbid=10152858772781987&adbpl=fb&adbpr=9815486986Runners often obsess over weather reports, tracking the coolest time of day in which to run. But as anyone who's ever tried to finish a five-miler in steamy conditions knows, it's not just the temperature that matters, it's the humidity.

“Of all the climate measurements we take to assess heat risk for our runners, humidity is the biggest factor,” says George Chiampas, D.O., the medical director of the Chicago Marathon. Humidity makes warm summer runs even more taxing because the higher the moisture content of the air, the hotter it feels. An 88-degree day with a relative humidity just under 40 percent, for example, will feel like 88 degrees. Hot, yes, but when humidity reaches 70 percent, that same 88 temperature feels like 100 degrees.

Unless you're lucky enough to live in Paradise, Nevada—the least humid city in the U.S.—here's how to cope when running in steamy conditions. Read Original Article Here…

Summer Running: How to Stand the Heat

Summer Running: How to Stand the Heat

summer runningHowever many bad-weather-will-make-you-tougher quotes we collect, there’s still one aspect of weather that most of us do our best to dodge: heat. Bolstered perhaps by health warnings every time the mercury climbs into the red zone, many of us do everything we can to avoid it: running at dawn or in the late evening or even seeking shelter on air-conditioned treadmills. It is, however, possible to run in heat. In the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, Portuguese distance star Maria Fernanda Moreira Ribeiro set an Olympic 10,000m record under hot, humid conditions (82 degrees with 60 percent relative humidity, according to historical data from Weather Underground). In the process, she posted a time of 31:01.63—one that 16 years later would still have put her in the top 10 in the much more temperate conditions of the London Olympics. The bottom line is that the human body is remarkably adaptable to heat. In fact, says Lawrence Armstrong, a heat researcher at the University of Connecticut, its ability to adapt to high temperatures is faster and more dramatic than its ability to adjust to any other environmental stress that nature can throw at us, such as altitude or cold. Read Original Article Here…

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